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Thursday, September 10, 2009

Group therapy for the unorganized


The Eastsider prefers to keep his mess private. But professional organizer Beth Zeigler has discovered that people who are eager to get organized, and save some money, are more than happy to get help in a group setting. So, on Saturday Ziegler, who blogs at Apartment Therapy, will be hosting an Organizing Boot Camp at the Echo Park Methodist Church. Bring $30 and a bag of your paper work. What you get is 90-minutes of advice, supplies and access to paper shredders.

Click on the following link to read a Q & A with Zeigler, an Echo Park resident, about the Organizing Boot Camp and her business.

Q: Why start an Organizing Boot camp?

A: I came up with Organizing Boot Camp because I noticed a need for accountability when it came to organizing paperwork. Oftentimes, organizing paperwork can be seen as boring, overwhelming and stressful. I wanted to create an atmosphere where folks could come together, interact with a professional, learn tips and get that accountability in a group setting--all while having a good time. The idea also came around just as the economy started to take a dive and I noticed that folks needed an alternative to a professional organizer coming into their home (which for some can be difficult financially and emotionally).

In Organizing Boot Camp, you can expect music, group atmosphere, tips from a pro and all the supplies you''ll ever need. We even have shredders so folks can be done with it once and for all.

Q: Aren't people going to be hesitant admitting they are unorganized in public?

A: I find that all the folks that have come to Organizing Boot Camp have all been super supportive of one another and are excited to be there. I definitely give everyone a ton of credit for taking the first step (because I know how hard it is for folks to say, "hey, I'm stuck. I need help.") I try and relieve tension by making organizing accessible and super easy to understand. Making organizing fun (by having the boot camp in a group setting) relieves some of that pressure.

Q: How did you get into the organizing business?

A: I started organizing in 2006. At the time, I was working in a salon as the salon coordinator and contemplating graduate school. But honestly, I had no idea what I wanted to do. But I've always been really good at being neat and organized. It just so happened that the salon was a bit disorganized so I did what I always did--and created systems, labeled containers and changed the way the company ordered products which all helped the Salon run more efficiently. Then, one day, a client came in and we were chatting and she mentioned that she had just joined the National Association of Professional Organizers. I was like, huh? what? you've got to be kidding!! That day, I went home and got online--and joined NAPO that day.

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